Friday, April 10, 2015

Art of the American West. "In Without Knocking." 1909. A-Z Challenge

           In Without Knocking.  Charles M. Russell. (1864-1926)




Dover Publications. Inc. Mineola, New York.  Art of the American West.


This is an example of the "Cowboy" image of the American West, rough, sometimes breaking the law, think Clint Eastwood.


Charles M. Russell was born in St. Louis, Missouri, on March 19th, 1864.  As a child he fantasized about being a cowboy in the American West and at an early age was drawing his Western dreams and sculpting. He left home at 16 for Montana, and after spending two years there, became a wrangler.


For eleven years he indulged in two of his passions, cowboying and art.  Because he was self-taught, his wife Nancy is credited with giving him the confidence to become a full-time artist, he was not sure he could support himself and his family.  She also became his business manager and is credited with giving his art the financial success that it was.  He did very well selling his art back East, where he said his paintings brought "dead man's prices."  He also created bronzes with the same Western theme and even now, one can buy copies on line.  But his art now sells for millions.

Charles M. Russell

17 comments:

  1. The American west always held a great appeal to me too and I am so very fortunate to have had the chance to drive through Wyoming both west in 89 and east in 2011, and through all of Montana in 2011. Beautiful places indeed, although I could never live in a land locked state having grown up on the coast.

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    1. You would miss the ocean. I am a mountain girl, the mountains give me peace. The ocean to me has always been a bit frightening, never swim very far when I am in California. We do have a little bit of everything here in the US, mountains, ocean, desert, woods, rock formations, etc.

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  2. awesome painting. I love all the cards scattered in the dust. The horse falling over lends credibility to the ruckus.

    Bushman
    2015 A to Z Challenge Ambassador
    @jwb81074

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    1. Hadn't thought before about the horse, it does make the scene more real. So, what is the story behind the painting, a card game gone wrong or? Thanks for stopping by, Jeff, I know you are busy monitoring the challenge.

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  3. Really interesting - something else I've learned from you. Love the panting but I think his work might just be outside my price range!

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  4. Really interesting - something else I've learned from you. Love the panting but I think his work might just be outside my price range!

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    1. But you can buy his reproductions. All of the paintings I have described are famous to the extent than you can buy copies, plus coffee cups, plus magnets for your fridge!

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    2. Well, there ya go! Clearly passed me by! While I'm here I have to say much I enjoyed your comment on my blog about your son's wedding in Greece. You captured the feel of the place so well. Thanks for taking the time to write it.

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    3. Well, there ya go! Clearly passed me by! While I'm here I have to say much I enjoyed your comment on my blog about your son's wedding in Greece. You captured the feel of the place so well. Thanks for taking the time to write it.

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  5. I was going to rush out and buy a couple of his paintings!!! I love this painting - so full of life and action. Copies, nah, originals only thank you. I wish.

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    1. There is always the fridge magnet, Jo.

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  6. He did alright for himself! Definitely getting dead man's prices now. I hope that one horse is OK - it might have a broken leg.

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  7. He did alright with a good woman in his life who had faith in him.

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  8. I love the stories of the American West, wether they were accurate or not. There was a certain romance about the adventure and discovery. The pictures that show this are part of the American story and are precious.

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  9. So many stories and myths. But I guess that is true of any history. But there is a certain mystique about the "Cowboy,"

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  10. Hi Nat - what an amazing painting .. so vibrant, full of life, and full of intent - and how wonderful he had a wife who supported, encouraged and managed him .. recognising those talents. Brilliant post - and lovely to find out about him ... cheers Hilary

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  11. Sadly, no women artists in the Western Art Group during those years that I could find.

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